Price US $399

Burton Nug Review And Buying Advice

Burton Nug 2015 - 2011 Review by The Good Ride

The Burton Nug is a peculiar but very fun quiver board. It’s not for everyone but if you are into trying different boards then you should definitely give this a try. It’s a very little board that rides big. Like Burton says ride the Nug 8-10cm smaller than your normal board and we agree. Being soo small the Nug had a slightly strange feel at first but after a few turns it becomes pretty fun.

In my opinion the 2015 Burton Nug hasn’t really changed much from the 2014 model.  It says new flat top but it seems pretty similar to the 2014 flat top/flat to rocker camber profile.  It does come in a 154 this year so there is another mid/wide board for riders with bigger feet.

Size 146, 148 & 150 

Days: 20+
Conditions: Snowment with icy patches to powder and everything in between.  
Riders: James, Peter and Jimbo
Boots: Burton SLX, Burton Ion, Burton HailBurton Ambush
Bindings: Burton Cartel, Burton Cartel Limited,Burton Genesis, Burton Malavita EST with Hinge Tech
Stance Widths- 22″, 22.5″ and 23″
Stance Angles: 15 front -15 Back.  15 front -9 back

The Burton Nug’s super small size is not as gimmicky as you would think but it’s still a quiver board.  All of us were very impressed with the big board performance these models offered.  You feel like you are on a very light big board edge to edge but when you start to throw it around you instantly notice the advantages of this board. It’s very light, playful and snappy and a super fun park ride.  It just makes everything easier to do in the jib and jump park.  For a jib park rider this might work as a full time board.  If you want to do more than that the Nug will become a quiver board.

In 2012 Burton Nug Line went Nug crazy. Burton made a Women’s Nug (awesome), the Directional Nug (possibly overkill and a little too quiver) and the Me Nug (overkill). So aside from the new nug’s the 2011 Nug is very similar to the 2012 Twin Nug. All years and models have the Squeezebox tech except for the Women’s Nug. For 2013 the Directional Nug evolved into the Burton Root but the twins still remain.

On Snow Feel: The Burton Nug is a continuous rocker board but it’s a lot more stable between the feet than you would think for this shape. It borders on the Loose to Mostly Stable side of things. The V-Rocker or continuous rocker on the Nug seems to be less curvy and more on the flatter side but that could be because it’s so small. Either way it wasn’t as loose between the feet as the larger V-Rocker or Flying V-Rocker boards. It still was catch free but it just felt a little more stable between the feet and this to us was pretty cool. It’s better one-footing off the chair and flat basing than we expected.

Powder:  Just too small but it would float better than a camber version.  You would think this would be horrible but it’s better than you would think and it does naturally fight to point your nose up.  Still it’s nothing we would really like to be out on in a deeper powder day.

Turn Initiation and Carving: Very Very Easy to turn. The rocker and the exceptionally short length makes for super easy turning. Wider radius turns are ok but this board really isn’t about turning. It’s not bad to carve in good conditions for a continuous rocker board but it’s still washy when you lean into it.  The lack of edge hold isn’t there when it comes to harder snow and it has the same washy characteristics that all continuous rocker boards do.  This is a butter/ollie/jib/jump board.

Speed: Peter Straight lined a pretty steep hill and got to 65mph on the GPS Goggles he was wearing but Peter is not right in the head. Still this board is not made for speed like that but it doesn’t chatter at all. The base picks up speed well and it is more than fine in any place in the park.

Uneven Terrain: The Nug is small,  nimble and the flex handles uneven end of the day snow to even mogul runs if you want to go that way.  It holds up well in all levels of bumpiness.

Approximate Weight: Light and due to it’s very small size is almost un-noticeable on the chair.

Edge Hold: Lacking here like all Burton rocker boards. We felt the board slip under us numerous times on edge in hard snow. It is our biggest complaint about this unique board. We’d like to see a little more edge hold like many companies provide for their reverse camber boards. The 1/2 MM extension at each foot which is called “Frostbite” is severely lacking when it comes to grip.  Kyle and I personally won’t take these boards out when its moderately hard because the edge slip is scary but Jimbo and Peter are ok with it.  This would be a night mare in icy conditions like the east coast.

Flex: Soft is the name of the Nug’s game but it wasn’t as soft as we thought it would be. There are many Burton boards that ride small and this small board rides big. Both testers were on the heavy end or over (editor) the weight scale for the 146 but it did a great job supporting both of us.

Switch: Excellent because it’s a true twin with a centered stance. The Directional Nug isn’t as good but it’s still not bad.

Jibbing: A little board like this is awesome in a jib park. The Nug has a pretty flat profile for a rocker board. It adds to the small size and we found it terribly easy to hit even more difficult rails than we would normally hit.  It has that make you better kind of feeling like we felt with the Lib Tech Box Scratcher.

Pipe: It’s just missing the edge hold as well as good drive between the walls for good pipe riding. If The Nug had better edge hold this could be acceptable in the pipe.  Instead this is soft spring riding only.

Jumps: This was pretty fun generating your own air and pretty fun hitting just about any size kicker. It’s so easy to spin on this board. Even without the Malavita EST bindings that have “hinge tech” (makes it easier to ollie) the Nugs were pretty fun to pop on. I felt like I had more spring from most of the Flying V-Rocker (hybrid rocker) Burton boards but this isn’t bad at all.

All in all the Nug was a surprise to us. It’s more than just a gimmick board for the rider and it blows minds in the jib park.  This is a jib board that offers a little more than you would expect elsewhere in the park and even mountain.  The only issue is the edge hold and in moderate to hard conditions its a glaring one.  So at 399 this could be a fun board to add to your quiver and definitely satisfies an effortless butter/jib mood.


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Burton Nug Review And Buying Advice SKU UPC Model

Much more than expected

Feb 19, 2014 by Riccardo
Ability Level: Expert • 
Riding Style: Freeride/Freestyle aggressive • 
Days You Ride A Year: About 60 • 
Strengths: Feels light, playful, stable for the size • 
Weaknesses: Sometimes feet are too close to board's nose and tail • 
(for Boards, Boots & Bindings) Height, Weight And Boot Size: 190cm, 78 Kg., Burton Imperial size 12 

Just to give a reference to evaluate my short review, I started my snowboarding career in 1988, also competing at national and international levels, just back in the 90s. I can ride alpine boards with hard boots as well as freestyle boards. At the moment I own a Jones Carbon Flagship 163W (Burton Diode 2014 bindings), a Burton Custom X 59 Wide (Cartels), and some other non relevant boards like a Burton Ultraprime as alpine. I also owned a Travis Rice Pro back in 2012.
The Nug I tested was a 146, so I was really at the weight limit. Anyway, I enjoyed the board since the very beginning.
Even if I love the regular camber boards (except my Jones which is an hybrid) I found this board very easy to control. I expected a more "nervous" board, considering that I like to ride aggressively and very fast on the slopes. This board can carve clean, it's not a camber board but if you have the skills you can carve too, taking into account that its sidecut radius is pretty short.
At high speeds is more controllable than expected, I ridden it up to 76.6 Kph, very carefully :)
Jumping and jibbing seems much more easier with the Nug, and probably actually it is. The board feels very light under the feet: it's a different feel compared to the Burton Method, but I think that the Method is a pipe board, the Nug is a quiver board that is very fun to ride and - for someone - could be the only board to own.
I also tried it in powder: the conditions were lovely (about 70 cm. of fresh powder). My stance was centred so I had to be well balanced on my back foot, but on the right slope, it can be ridden pretty well.
At the end, I will buy this board, maybe in the 150 size since it should be more appropriate to my height and weight, but I definitely love this board.


My option for just fun days

Feb 19, 2013 by Marcio Mori
Ability Level: Beginer • 
Riding Style: Freerider • 
Days You Ride A Year: 20 days • 
Strengths: None • 
Weaknesses: Icy conditions 

In my Life,i tried 4 boards: Nug,K2 anagram,Sherlock and Custon X.
I thought Nug easier for me because its flexbility and smaller.It's Good for beginers even in icy conditions.Hard to get speed but very easy to control.It 's hard don't like because is a easy board to skiparks.I agree it is not so good to powder.(for this I prefer Sherlock).Among theirs,that is i ride more for sure.I consider me a very careful rider.My crazy friend prefer custonX.


4.0 4.0 2 2 Just to give a reference to evaluate my short review, I started my snowboarding career in 1988, also competing at national and international levels, just back in the 90s. I can rid Burton Nug Review And Buying Advice

Approx. Weight

Feels Light

Riding Style

Freestyle

Riding Level

Intermediate - Expert

Available Widths

Regular, Mid/Wide

Manufactured in

China

Shape

True Twin

Camber Profile

Continuous Rocker

Stance

Centered

On Snow Feel

Semi-Stable

Turn Initiation

Very Easy

Flex

Medium/Soft

Edge Hold

Med/Soft Snow

Powder

Average

Carving

Average

Speed

Good

Uneven Terrain

Excellent

Switch

Excellent

Jumps

Great

Jibbing

Excellent

Pipe

Average

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